Buy Currency

Exchange SGD to AUD

Exchange your Singapore dollars to Australian dollars at our stores or ATMs. Sell your foreign currency by contacting our stores or finding your nearest ATM to know our exchange rate.

Exchange your SGD for AUD with us!

We have 180+ stores across Australia that will buy your leftover SGD bank notes in Australia, with the exception of old or damaged notes. Have any other leftover foreign currency notes? We buy 50+ FX currencies – even rare ones such as Icelandic krona and Bermuda dollars!

You can also use our foreign currency ATMs to conveniently withdraw Australian dollars and selected foreign currencies at great rates if you are travelling in Australia and short on cash!

How to Exchange Your SGD to AUD?

You can withdraw SGD from all our foreign currency ATMs around Australia. Some ATMs also offer card withdrawals of selected foreign currencies in addition to AUD at great rates!

Find your nearest ATM

How to Sell Foreign Currency to Travelex

Simply follow the steps below to exchange your SGD to AUD with Travelex:

  1. Take your foreign currency banknotes into any of our 180+ Travelex stores across Australia.
  1. Our friendly staff will inform you of the buy rate for the SGD (the rate which we will buy your foreign currency at).
  1. Exchange your SGD banknotes to Australian dollars and leave with a little more AUD in your wallet!

Find your nearest store

What is your SGD Buy Rate?

This changes daily due to fluctuating exchange rates, and differs at each Travelex store & ATM. Please contact your nearest Travelex store for the current SGD buy rate or find your nearest ATM to exchange your foreign currency for AUD.

Do you Buy SGD Coins?

No, unfortunately we do not accept any foreign coins; however, there are plenty of things you can do with your leftover SGD coins!

  1. Give them to charity - UNICEF’s Coins for Kids is a charity that collects leftover FX coins. The funds then go towards a number of great initiatives such as providing clean drinking water, much-needed vaccines, food, school books and stationary. Click here to find out more. Many airlines and airports also have collection boxes or envelopes where you can donate your coins to charity.
  1. Save them for another trip - if you think you (or friends or family!) may be visiting a destination where they can use US coins, save them for your next trip.
  2. Keep them as mementos from your trip – it’s a fun way of remembering all the destinations you’ve visited!
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The lowdown on the Singapore dollar

With its roots way back in the Spanish dollar, the Singapore dollar has evolved into a currency all of its own. These days, it’s usually written as S$ to differentiate it from all the other dollar currencies out there – and there’s quite a few across the world!

Between 1845 and 1939 Singapore used the Straits dollar, a currency used across a group of British territories in Southeast Asia known as the Straits Settlements. This was replaced in 1953 by the Malayan dollar before being again replaced by the Malaya and British Borneo dollar. In 1965, Singapore sought independence from Malaysia, putting an end to the common currency used between Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei. Hard to keep up, right?

On 7 April 1967, Singapore established the Board of Commissioners of Currency and issued its first independent notes and coins. Until 1973, you could still exchange Malaysian ringgit with the Singapore dollar at the same rate, and even today, you can still exchange the Brunei dollar with the Singapore. Good to know!

A look back at Australian dollar to Singapore dollar rates

The Singapore dollar was initially pegged to the British pound at a rate of S$60 to £7. As Singapore’s economy continued to grow and its trade with other countries began to expand, Singapore pegged its currency against a fixed and undisclosed trade-weighted basket of currencies from 1973 to 1985.

After 1985 Singapore adopted a monitoring band, meaning that the currency was allowed to float within a specified bandwidth, closely monitored by the Monetary Authority of Singapore against the currencies of Singapore’s main trading partners.

Singapore dollar over the last 10 years

In November 2005, 1 US dollar was exchanging at a rate of 0.59 Singapore dollars, rising at a steady pace to reach 0.83 by September 2011. The Singapore dollar has been in gradual decline over the last four years, falling gently to 0.73 or S$0.73 to $1.

In October 2008, the Singapore dollar fell dramatically against the Aussie dollar, from 1.31 in July 2008 to 0.929 as a result of the global financial crisis. A year later in October 2009, it was back up to 1.29 and has been steadily declining ever since, and sits at a rate of 1.04 to 1 AUD as of May 2017.

*The information contained in this article has been compiled by Travelex from different external sources. The figures provided are indicative only and are there to provide an idea of the amount of travel money you may need during your trip. Travelex does not ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information shown. Nothing in this article is to be considered financial advice. Travelex Limited does not accept any liability for any loss or damage derived from any reliance on the information in this article. Travelex Limited (ABN 36 004 179 953, AFSL Number 222444) arranges for and sells Online Foreign Currency via its Online Ordering Facility. You should consider the Online Foreign Currency Product Disclosure Statement and Terms and Conditions before deciding whether to acquire the product.